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has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king in a more just society. but i must tell you what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits are out of the hallways and the public walls of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. .. he has been riding the horse since the day he got here, and thanks to karlin's leadership. thanks to marvin pinkert, he calls the genius behind the development of the new space. all of us as citizens can far better experience our history, and as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen, i value this place deeply. it's very, very important. your participation is urged because it's a good thing and for an additional reason, that my vocal chords may fail sometimes but i'm going to go for it, and let's hope i can keep on talking. the two days -- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh is
that has, despite great accomplishment, has not fulfilled the passion and the dreams of lyndon johnson and martin luther king for a more just society. but i must tell you that what we are sitting in today and the interactive exhibits around the hallways and the public vaults of the national archives are a totally new phenomenon. i remember as a kid and when my son jack was a kid you walked into this austere building and you stood in a line and you saw the constitution and the declaration and maybe another couple of things, and you marched back out. lyndon johnson had an expression which he used often and usually shrewdly where he would say that someone was all hat and no horse. i have learned in the case of kansas farmer who became a governor and is now our archivist he has been riding a horse since the day he got here. and thanks to carlin's leadership, thanks to marvin pinkert who he calls the genius behind the development of the new space, all of us as citizens can far better experience our history. as a journalist, as a historian, and as a citizen i value this place deeply. it's ve
with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
johnson if he heard bobby kennedy something critical of president johnson through king. in other words, this was hoover's job was basically to ingratiate himself with johnson to punish bobby kennedy, whom she didn't like and to punish king whenever he could. c-span: by the way, did you listen to the johnson takes? >> guest: yes. that's a whole -- c-span: so you could hear all of those? >> guest: you can hear those. the john thune defeat could johnson tapes were wonderful. they corroborate a lot of what's in a declassified meetings on vietnam and in some of the files, but there's no substitute for actually hearing the tapes. and i quote from a number of them here. c-span: what is the trilogy? >> guest: the trilogy? c-span: money, loyalty, sex. >> guest: money, loyalty -- that became the short hand once bobby -- once dr. king became aware as i said, juneau, a lot of times they thought the thing store being done to them, a hostile things that were being done to them by the police were being done by segregation molest police force, but once they became aware that is the fbi, they had these
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching, welcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect argument, by activism and blood. and, above all,
at that time. the samuel johnson had not picked them up. he saw the language of of the street as part of what was part of language. so this -- there was this sort of democratic background of this thing. and as it goes along, there are things that, for example, jefferson creates which are hysterical. i mean, he comes up with twistification which sounds like something that george bush would come up with. [laughter] but there's some just wonderful things. and, of course b, his -- preble on the seedier side -- probably on the seedier side, and i'm relying on the oxford english dictionary to tell you this, but the cop la story verb to shag is credited to thomas jefferson in one of his diaries. and it does not appear in the any slang dictionary for another 30 years. and this, again, i'm using the be all and end all for sort of early nailing down when a word was created, so austin powers did not create the word "shag," it was thomas jefferson. [laughter] you can tell, by the way, that i have a lot of fun doing this. the other challenge was just looking at how this progressed. you can look at differe
to raise in. in the election, president lyndon johnson withdrew from the race, and hubert humphrey was nominated. on election night, george wallace one five states as an independent nominee. here is a resident nixon's swearing in and, about 20 minutes. -- and speech, about 20 minutes. >> do you richard milhouse nixon solemnly swear that you will faithfully exit queue the office -- >> that i will faithfully execute the office >> of president of the united states. >> of president of the united states. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states so that you got. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states, so help me god. [applause] ♪ >> senator dirksen, mr. chief justice, mr. vice president, president johnson, vice president humphrey, my fellow americans, and my fellow citizens of the world community, i ask you to share with me today the majesty of this moment. in the orderly transfer of power, we celebrate the unity that keeps us free. each moment in history i
? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term overreach. probably should have. but the point is that he is very aware of what has gone before and he knows that if you don't read all these books about previous presidents, previous leaders, really in world history, you're limiting yourself to yore own personal experience and that is pretty bad. >> is there a particular president, doris, with whom this president identifies the most or respects the most? >> well, i think when he first came into office, obviously, lincoln mattered a great deal to him. i mean, in part probably because the emancipation proclamation, the end of slavery, and he's the first african-american president, almost like closing that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
during johnson's first six months and turned out to be prophetic and a fair warning. >> yeah, no. 1966 midterms, 46-seat landslide for republicans. great example there. >> absolutely. a lot of democratic governors after the election went to johnson and said, please stop sending this stuff to congress making us look too liberal to get re-elected. >> all right. michael, thank you very much. >> thanks. great to see you all, guys. >> all right. >>> next, what if anything can manti te'o learn when and if he finally comes clean from lance armstrong's confession, aka, how to not be a complete and utter loser? lance is next in the spin as we roll on. it's friday, january 18th. i didn't think it was anything. i had pain in my abdomen... it just wouldn't go away. i was spotting, but i had already gone through menopause. these symptoms may be nothing... but they could be early warning signs of a gynecologic cancer, such as cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer. feeling bloated for no reason. that's what i remember. seeing my doctor probably saved my life. warning signs are not the same for everyon
vice president andrew johnson's drunken inaugural address. this is about an hour.>> thank you very much. that is a hard act to follow. i will try my best. we are about to have an inauguration on monday. the first question that comes to people's minds often in inauguration as they are standing or sitting in the cold waiting on the ceremonies to begin is we have separation of powers in this country. how is it that the president of the united states is being sworn into office on the steps of the capitol t legislative branch of the government. how did this all come about? it's not in the constitution. if you read the constitution it's sparse. it tells you the date and time the president is to be sworn in and the exact words of the oath but it doesn't say anything else. but yet we have this long two centuries of tradition built up around presidential inaugurations. it comes down to which came first, the chicken or the egg. and the fact is in 1979 when this brand new government was getting started the first part of government to meet was the congress. it was supposed to meet on march 4 but co
. >> patrick leahy, thank you for being with us. >> we continue conversation with fawn johnson and jennifer steinhauer. >> what is the moment you will remember? >> he expressed frustration about the gun hearings he's about to hold. it reflects the difficult position that he is in and the dynamic of the entire democratic caucus. there are a lot of members that come from red states or have a very moderate, pro-gun record. he is in a tough spot himself in terms of protecting and working with his members who are concerned about going too far or doing anything on guns. and also as regarding his role as chairman. he mentions decisions had to go through his committee. dianne feinstein is running an assault weapons bill. she's about to introduce it. other members are interested. he wants to be associated with and control this process but he has to work very carefully. >> you wrote about this about the devil will be the details. >> what is an assault weapon? how do you define it? this is not a surprise, the kinds of questions i am asking, will not be answered immediately. these are the things you ha
to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt, lyndon johnson, texas. richmond nixon, california. gerald ford, was not elected. so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he
eddie bernice johnson of california, congresswoman joyce beatty. she's gone. representative holt from new jersey, representative frankel from florida, representatives velazquez from new york, representative bon meche from -- bon michie from oregon. -- bonamici from oregon. >> thank you, madam chair. my question is probably a broad one and widespread and probably directed to the mayor and the chief of police. with all of the budgetary restraints that we suffer throughout this country, and certainly here, do you think that you can have an effective program without federal funding? >> no. >> we will take all five questions at one time. mr. holt. >> thank you for the stories. they certainly make one cry, but they should make one angry and outraged and determined and complitted. -- committed. why is america so different in the statistics that you gave us, mayor nutter? >> you know, it's not that we have so much more mental illness or less mental health care than other countries or so many fewer armed police or so many more defenseless students or it's not only american youth who play viole
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
of that was contingent on not taking a stand on vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king in the stand he took a cozy felt -- we have handed civil rights and voting rights over and now you are going to go against me for re-election. you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: yes. king now i understand what courage it took to take the stand that he did and i understand more about why he hesitated. faretta was very much involved in the antiwar movement from an early stage but again she was not the public figure so he could send her essentially to speak for him. >> host: again he proved dr. king right. >> guest: i think so. this was one of the ways -- i think he's a visionary. i think he understood the connection between the anti-colonial movements going on around the world and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing -- we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the assistance of the soviet union so we saw it in cold war terms. >> host:
and congress was contingent on not taking a stand with vietnam. >> host: president johnson was very upset with dr. king he felt that we have handed civil rights and voting rights over now you go against me that imf for reelection on the vietnam war? >> guest: now eyes understood what courage it took to take a stand that he did and why he hesitated. coretta did not. she was very involved earlier but she was not the public figure. he could send her to speak with him. >> host: and then proved him right. >> guest: this is the way that he is a visionary. with the anti-colonial movement around the world and have a cold war prevented us to show us we were on the wrong side because because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many wanted to have the system of the soviet union they were for it but we were opposed. >> host: you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: for me looking back it was not that difficult of a choice. i knew i would not go into military. >> host: weren't you drafted? >> guest: several times. i tried to be a conscientious objector
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
regulation -- until it happened. consider the civil rights act of 1964. it took johnson's legislative genius to overcome what seemed to be an unshakeable logjam. in our lifetimes we have served enough non-trivial change to impaire that the iron grip of these forces can be shattered and policy can progress. and the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance of civil obligation will command sustained attention from our political leadership, as lobbyists apply their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours will discharge a critical role in principled scaffolding for the debate. our scholars have investigated gun violence for the last two decades. we have produced national recognized research to curtail gun violence. we have accumulated a wealth of knowledge and we hope much of it will come to the floor the next few days. we have convened scholars and advocates and want to sue this opportunity to cut through the din of the shrill and incendiary by identifying specific recommendations that evidence- based analysis will work and can be rendered congruent with our legal institution
. a briefcase came in from the white house from president johnson full of papers. region have a diplomatic couriers in the. is it you go. we drove to the night. i said the back from one to kept chipping the rest. i get down there in the morning in the one was there except helicopters flying over all of the cows and goats going completely out of the mind. they're running around like crazy, just berserk for fear of the helicopters. the people stand around not knowing what to do it themselves . where is the american ambassador? oprah's he is down the coast. on the beach, and that is where the ambassador was supposed to be. so i said, let's go down there. we went. and just as i got there, just as i got there the ambassador came striding out of the hotel wearing nothing but a bathing suit and a bathing cap. and i tried to stop the ambassador. somehow give him the briefcase. i did not know the combination. it did give me the combination. the head of security was down there. did you relieved me of the briefcase. i said, what's going on. the investor is going to walk into the mediterranean to prov
on the shoulders of people who have been in the white house. president lincoln, kennedy, johnson. the asa stands on the shoulders of the black people who experienced it in the white house. as you noted in your intro, this goes from thosroindividuals who worked to build the white house when washington, d.c., when the country first came into existence, washington dc did not exist. it literally had to be built and it took 10 years. much of that labour from clearing the land, moving the trees and rocks came from african americans and slave labor. the iconic buildings that we know, the capital, the white house, both were built not only by unskilled black labor, people who did just sort of the hard work, but still black labor like carpenters, or african- americans. the first african-american who had engaged in the president's residence whether it was the white house we know now in washington or in the residence of the president george washington when he first went to new york and then when he moved from new york to the president's residence in philadelphia, and both of those residences, washington too
, and lyndon b. johnson in six years as majority leader faced one, and harry reid has faced 361 in the same six-year period. and even if you have the 60 votes to end one, they take up the power of the senate. >> stephanie: you know what is interesting. they just did this study -- this is no surprise to you, but the 112th congress was the most polarized ever. the distance between the two due to record levels between the 111th and 112th even different than the before when they used to take out pistols and shoot each over. >> yes. >> stephanie: i look at poll after poll -- i mean 90% of the american people want background checks for gun -- and you think -- and yet you hear over and over we're probably not going to be able to get any of this gun stuff done. but this is part of the reason right? >> it is part of the reason. why are we talking about reducing food stamps and hunger programs at a time when we can't even close a loophole for a oil company. well, it's a filibuster. dream act, why couldn't we do it? filibuster. and we had 59 votes to close debate, and we needed 6
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)